Shadow Dial

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Jul 232014
 

Shadow Dial | The Knitting Vortex

Light as a whisper and soft as a shadow, this simple tank top is knit in stockinette stitch with flutter cap sleeves. Laceweight yarn on larger needles creates a fabric with beautiful drape, while gentle waist shaping and simple details keep the look uncomplicated. The body is worked seamlessly from the bottom up with a scooped neckline and narrow purl edgings; stitches are picked up around the armholes then rapidly increased and worked in short rows to create the focal flutter sleeves. Shadow Dial is pretty and light, and just right for summer.

Shadow Dial is a new version of the Sundial Tee, which was published in Knitscene Summer 2013. It has more drape and an improved fit at a slightly more relaxed gauge of 24 st and 34 rows/4”, with an expanded range of ten sizes, which all include added length and a reshaped upper body with better strap coverage and a more deeply scooped front neckline. Additional detailed instructions for the upper body and flutter sleeve shaping have also been included, with a link to my new short row photo tutorial.

Techniques & Skills Used: knit/purl, increasing/decreasing, short rows, picking up stitches, 3-needle bind off.
Size: 30 (32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 48, 52)” bust; this top may be worn with negative ease for a fitted look, or a bit of positive ease for a more casual effect; sample shown in fourth size with 1” positive ease.
Yarn: Malabrigo Yarn Lace (100% baby merino wool; 470 yards/50g); 2 (2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4) skeins, shown in Violetas, or approximately 800 (850, 900, 950, 1050, 1100, 1150, 1200, 1350, 1450) yards of laceweight yarn.
Other Materials: US 6 (4mm) 24” circular needle or size to match gauge; Extra US 6 needle or dpn for 3-needle BO; Stitch markers (1 each colors A & B, 2 color C); Stitch holders (3); Yarn needle.
Gauge: 24 st and 34 rows/4” in stockinette stitch, after blocking.

See it on Ravelry, to read more or purchase the pattern.  

Shadow Dial side view | The Knitting Vortex  Shadow Dial | Last Look The Knitting Vortex  Shadow Dial flutter closeup | The Knitting Vortex

A new Sundial

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Jul 232014
 

Sundial Tee | The Knitting Vortex

Originally published in Knitscene Summer 2013, my Sundial Tee pattern is now available as an individual download from The Knitting Vortex. I’ve added just a bit of length, but other than that the pattern remains a close-fitting tank as it first appeared in the magazine. I’ve also included expanded shaping instructions for the neckline and the short row flutter sleeves, as well as my short row tutorial. For a slightly more relaxed fit knit at a larger gauge, I’ve also reworked the design and expanded the size range to ten sizes as Shadow Dial, also newly released. Whichever you choose, the soft and luscious laceweight yarn makes a pretty, romantic tee for the summer.

A splash of color flutters in the breeze, drawing the eye . . . like a poppy in the field. This simple tank top is knit in stockinette stitch with short row flutter sleeves. Laceweight yarn worked at a small gauge creates a wearable and figure-conscious fabric, which hugs the body in this fitted top. Gentle waist shaping, a scooped neck and narrow shoulders further define the shape, while the cap sleeves add softness and romance. The body is worked seamlessly from the bottom up with narrow purl edgings; stitches are picked up then rapidly increased and worked in short rows creating the fluttery sleeves. Sundial is a summer tank that is simple but special.

Techniques & Skills Used: knit/purl, increasing/decreasing, short rows (with link to tutorial), picking up stitches, 3-needle bind off.
Size: 28.5 (32, 35.5, 39, 42.75)” bust; this slim tank is designed to be worn with some negative ease for a fitted look. Sample shown in smallest size with 4” negative ease.
Yarn: Malabrigo Yarn Lace (100% baby merino wool; 470 yards/50g); 2 (2, 2, 3, 3) skeins, shown in Bergamota, or approximately 725 (825, 925, 1050, 1200) yards of laceweight yarn.
Other Materials: US 5 (3.75mm) 24” circular needle or size to match gauge; Extra US 5 needle or dpn for 3-needle BO; Stitch markers (1 each colors A & B, 2 color C); Stitch holders (3); Yarn needle.
Gauge: 27 st and 34 rows/4” in stockinette stitch, after blocking.

See it on Ravelry, to read more or purchase the pattern.  

Sundial back view | The Knitting Vortex  Sundial Tee | The Knitting VortexJPG  Sundial side | The Knitting Vortex

Layercake

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Jul 162014
 

Layercake cover | The Knitting Vortex

A delicious cropped cardigan worked seamlessly from the top down, Layercake features raglan construction and narrow stripes. Long ribbed cuffs end three-quarter length sleeves and match the wide hem which defines the waist. The matching buttonband is picked up and worked along the deep V-neck. In confectionary hues or your favorite color combination, this sweet cardi is a light layer over any outfit.

Techniques & Skills Used: raglan construction, knit/purl, increasing/decreasing, cable CO, backwards loop CO.
Size: 30 (32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 48, 52)” bust; shown in fourth size with 1” of positive ease
Yarn: Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light (100% superwash merino wool; 420 yards/100g), shown in Alizarin (MC) and Sugar Plum (CC). 2 (2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3) skeins MC and 1 (1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2) skeins CC, or approximately 600 (650, 700, 750, 800, 850, 900, 950, 1050, 1150) yards MC and 300 (325, 350, 375, 400, 425, 450, 475, 525, 600) yards CC of fingering weight yarn.
Other Materials: US 5 (3.75mm) 32” circular needle or size to match gauge; Stitch markers (10); Stitch holders (2); Yarn needle; ½” buttons 8 (9, 9, 9, 9, 10, 10, 10, 11, 11); Matching sewing thread and needle.
Gauge: 22 st and 32 rows/4″ in stockinette stitch, after blocking.

See it on Ravelry, to read more or purchase the pattern.  

Layercake | The Knitting Vortex  Layercake back view | The Knitting Vortex  Layercake buttoned | The Knitting Vortex

Tutorial: Short Rows using the wrap & turn method

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Jul 132014
 

SR w&t tutorial | The Knitting Vortex

Short Rows are one of my very favorite knitting things, ever. Need to shape a hem, make a bust dart or a shoulder slope? No seaming, no binding off, no problem – just work short rows and you can have angled sections of knitting that create shape and make a garment better fitting, or a shawl more interesting.

There are many ways to work short rows, all of which involve working a partial row (thus, the “short”) and then using one of several methods to turn the work and go back in the opposite direction, while making the turning point unobtrusive and attractive. Perhaps the most common and basic is the wrap & turn method, sometimes abbreviated to w&t. To work it, here’s what you have to do:

To w&t on a knit row:

1. Knit to the turning point; with yarn in back, insert the right needle tip purlwise into the next st, and slip it to the right needle.

2. Bring the yarn to the front.

SR w&t3 | The Knitting Vortex

3. Slip the wrapped st back to the left needle.

SR w&t4 | The Knitting Vortex

4. Turn the work, and if you’re working in stockinette stitch, bring the yarn to the front and purl the next row. If you’re working in garter stitch, leave the yarn in back when you turn the work, and knit the next row.

SR w&t5 The Knitting Vortex

To w&t on a purl row:

1. Purl to the turning point; with yarn in front, insert the right needle tip purlwise into the next st, and slip it to the right needle.

SR w&t6 The Knitting Vortex

2. Bring the yarn to the back.

SR w&t7 The Knitting Vortex

3. Slip the wrapped st back to the left needle.

SR w&t8 The Knitting Vortex

4. Turn the work and bring the yarn to the back and knit the next row. If you’re working in garter stitch, every row is a knit row, and you’ll be following the directions above instead.

SR w&t9 The Knitting Vortex

In stockinette stitch, the wraps would be visible in the fabric if just left there when you came back and worked the wrapped stitch on a subsequent row. To avoid that, you can hide the wrap by picking it up and working it together with the wrapped st.

To pick up a wrap on a knit row*:

1. Insert right needle tip knitwise into the front of the wrap.

SR w&t10 The Knitting Vortex

2. Then insert needle knitwise into the wrapped st.

SR w&t11 The Knitting Vortex

3. Knit the wrap and the st together as one.

SR w&t12 The Knitting Vortex

*Alternate Version – sometimes the wrapped stitch can be a bit wonky after it’s worked, because the wrap isn’t pulled completely to the back. If you find this to be the case, try an alternate version of picking up the wrap:

1. Insert right needle tip purlwise into the wrapped st and slip it to the right needle.

SR w&t alt1 The Knitting Vortex

2. With left needle tip, lift the wrap over the st and place it to the right of the st on the right needle. This takes a bit of manipulation.

SR w&t alt2 The Knitting Vortex

3. Slip both st and wrap back to the left needle.

SR w&t alt3 The Knitting Vortex

4. Knit the wrap and the st together as one.

SR w&t alt4 The Knitting Vortex

To pick up a wrap on a purl row*:

1. Insert right needle tip purlwise into the back of the wrap.

SR w&t13 The Knitting Vortex

2. Place the wrap onto the left needle.

SR w&t14 The Knitting Vortex

3. Insert right needle purlwise into both wrap and st.

SR w&t15 The Knitting Vortex

3. Purl the wrap and the st together as one.

SR w&t16 The Knitting Vortex

*Alternate Version – as on the RS, sometimes the wrapped stitch can be a bit wonky after it’s worked; try this alternate version of picking up the wrap to make it more invisible:

1. Insert right needle tip purlwise into the back of the wrap.

SR w&t13 The Knitting Vortex

2. Place the wrap over the st and onto the left needle, to the left of the st. Again, some manipulation is necessary.

SR w&t alt6 The Knitting Vortex

3. Purl the wrap and the st together as one.

SR w&t alt7 The Knitting Vortex

In garter stitch, there is generally no need to pick up the wraps, since they disappear into the garter fabric; just knit subsequent rows, leaving the wraps where they are. For this reason, I like the quick and easy wrap & turn method when I’m working garter stitch. Depending on your yarn, w&t may not be the tidiest method when working in stockinette stitch, especially if the purl side will be visible. For other short row methods, I’ll be posting additional tutorials in the upcoming weeks.

Short Rows using the yarnover method

Short Rows using the German method

Short Rows using the Japanese method

Short Rows using the Shadow Wrap method