Jan 202012
 

Magickal Quidditch Socks | The Knitting Vortex

A tribute to the Quidditch players of Harry Potter’s Wizarding World, or to any sock-loving Muggle, these colorwork socks are knit from the cuff down with a heel flap and gusset. The simple slipstitch technique requires working only one color at a time per row. Show your House colors with pride!

Techniques & Skills Used: longtail CO, knit/purl, increasing/decreasing, slipstitch colorwork, knitting in the round, grafting; this pattern includes both charts for the colorwork and full written instructions.
Size: S (M, L); 60 (68, 76) st; to fit 10 (11, 12)” calf, or Women’s US 6/7 (8/9, 10/11) shoe size; shown in size M.
Yarn: Madelinetosh Tosh Sock (100% superwash merino wool; 395 yards/114g); 1 skein each, or approximately 215 (240, 265) yards MC and 70 (80, 90) yards CC. Sample shown in Baltic (MC) and Ginger (CC).
Other Materials: US 1 (2.25mm) dpns, or 32” circular needle if using Magic Loop, or size to match gauge; Stitch markers (3); Yarn needle.
Gauge: 34 st and 48 rows/4” in stockinette stitch; 36 st and 48 rows/4” in Checkerboard slipstitch pattern; 34 st and 68 rows/4” in Diamond Stripe slipstitch pattern, after blocking. Slipstitch colorwork is very dense; the slipstitch
rows are also somewhat difficult to measure, as one slipped stitch represents two rows. The best way to measure for fit is to try on the sock.

See it on Ravelry, to read more or purchase the pattern. 

Magickal Quidditch Socks |The Knitting Vortex      Magickal Quidditch Socks heel view | The Knitting Vortex

 

Jan 112012
 

I’ve always liked different construction methods, for garments, accessories, or whatever. It’s interesting to find better ways to make things, and sometimes the better way differs depending upon what’s being made. In terms of sweaters, I favor seamless construction whenever possible, to avoid excessive casting on, binding off and picking up. It’s not that I mind seaming, and sometimes I can see the advantage of the structure gained in a seamed piece; I chose to keep the seams when I knit my Plummi, because it was such a long, heavy sweatercoat. I also think nothing can beat a picked-up button band, where you can control the tension of the band versus the body, despite the anguish of getting the right number and interval of stitches.

But in general, I like seamless construction from the top down, so you can try it on as you go and make adjustments along the way. Recently, the innovative SusieM developed a new seamless top down construction method she christened Contiguous, and she shared it on Ravelry in the Contiguous group. Brilliantly, it involves casting on the back neck stitches and a very small number for the fronts, then increasing rapidly along both sides of the shoulder seam to shape the fronts and back. When the shoulder tip is reached, that “seam” is split into two armhole lines, with further increasing to shape the sleeve and later the armhole.

I’ve finally managed to struggle free of knitting obligations in order to begin a Contiguous cardigan of my own. After some initial mathing, and then remathing after trying out various increase methods, I cast on with RYC Cashsoft 4 Ply in a beautiful pale grey Weather color. I plan to chronicle the Journey through Contiguous in a WIP Wednesday series here.

    shoulder

Ring of Velvet – FO Friday

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Jan 062012
 

The Northeast has been experiencing a wave of freezing temperatures this week, and given my usual aversion to hats, I thought that a hood-esque item would be just the thing. I had picked up some Loops & Threads Cozy Wool at the big box – I freely admit that the almost irridescent purple is what drew me in – and decided that a slightly wider Ring of Sapphire, with ribbed edging to pull it in a bit, would be just the thing.

Ring of Velvet cowl

The Cozy Wool is super soft, really nice to work with, and very comfortable to wear; and as a 50/50 blend has a nice wool content AND a nice price. And my head is warm. I used three skeins; two for the seed stitch, and one for the rib.

Ring of Velvet      Ring of Velvet    Ring of Velvet

Jan 032012
 

Crimp Hat & Crimpy Mitts | The Knitting Vortex

Crimp

Crimp is a hat with built-in slouch created by tuck stitches, and includes both a photo and video tutorial for this fun technique. Alternating sections of ribbing and stockinette add interest to the crown, making Crimp a unique hat and a perfect companion to the Crimpy Mitts.

Techniques & Skills Used: Cable CO, knit/purl, tuck stitch, decreasing; both a photo and video tutorial are provided for the tuck stitch.
Size: S (M); 18 (20)” unstretched, to fit 20 (22)” head circumference.
Yarn: Malabrigo Yarn Rios (100% superwash merino wool, 210 yards/100g), 1 skein. Size M shown in Cumparsita. 2 skeins are needed to make both the hat and mitts.
Other Materials: US 7 (4.5mm) dpns or 32” circular needle if using Magic Loop, or size to match gauge; Spare US 7 dpn for tucks; Stitch markers (8); Yarn needle.
Gauge: 20 st and 28 rows/4” in stockinete stitch, after gentle blocking.

See it on Ravelry, to read more or purchase the pattern.  

Crimpy Mitts

The Crimpy Mitts are long armwarmers with fun textural tucks at the wrist, which create a built-in slouchy look. Ribbing detail on the thumb matches the extra long cuffs, which add texture and warmth and are perfect to wear with three-quarter length sleeves. These mitts are companions to the Crimp hat.

Techniques & Skills Used: Cable CO, knit/purl, tuck stitch, increasing/decreasing; both a photo and video tutorial are provided for the tuck stitch.
Size: S (M, L): 6.5 (7.25, 8)” palm circumference, 4 (4.5, 5)” length from wrist. Cuff length is approximately 9.5”.
Yarn: Malabrigo Yarn Rios (100% superwash merino wool, 210 yards/100g), 1 skein. Size M shown in Cumparsita. 2 skeins are needed to make both the hat and mitts.
Other Materials: US 7 (4.5mm) dpns or 32” circular needle if using Magic Loop, or size to match gauge; Spare US 7 dpn for tucks; Stitch markers (3); Yarn needle.
Gauge: 20 st and 28 rows/4” in stockinete stitch, after gentle blocking.

See it on Ravelry, to read more or purchase the pattern.  

Crimp & Crimpy | The Knitting Vortex  Crimp Hat side view | The Knitting Vortex  Crimpy Mitts hero | The Knitting Vortex