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Tutorial: Short Rows using the Shadow Wrap method

Tutorial: Short Rows using the Shadow Wrap method

The final post in my series of tutorials for working Short Rows demonstrates the Shadow Wrap method, promulgated by Socktopus. As in the German and Japanese methods, an extra loop is made from the row below to disguise the turning point; the extra loop in this case is a stitch worked into the stitch below just before turning, creating a twinned stitch at the turning point. Later both loops of the twinned stitch are worked together to close the gap. The Shadow Wrap method on a knit row: 1. Knit to the turning point, then knit into the stitch below the next stitch on the left needle, creating a twinned stitch. 2. Slip this twinned stitch to the left needle without twisting it. 3. Turn the work, and purl the next row. The Shadow Wrap method on a purl row: 1. Purl to the turning point, then slip the next stitch purlwise to the right needle. 2. Insert the left needle tip into the stitch below the slipped stitch on the right needle, lifting the . . .

Garden State Sheep & Fiber

Garden State Sheep & Fiber

This weekend was New Jersey’s 20th annual fiber fest, and although it’s small, I like to think of it as powerful. There are four barns full of animals, fleece, spinning, shows and vendors – just enough for a good half day, with the added bonus of being local for me. Almost everything is under cover, which worked out nicely this year in the feels-like 100 degree heat, followed in the afternoon by drenching thunderstorms. I left before the actual rains came, but felt like I had been soaked anyway by that time from the humidity. The shade helped them, but the animals were hot too; the sheep that were getting sheared seemed pleased to lose the extra insulation. This guy was a blue ribbon winner, and he looked totally over it. The angora bunnies were alert, but keeping motion to a minimum. There were kids leading sheep around the show ring, the local spinners’ guild doing their thing, lots of fibery crafts (SO many felted things!) and a super array of booths from indie dyers. . . .

Tutorial: Short Rows using the Japanese method

Tutorial: Short Rows using the Japanese method

The fourth in my series of tutorials for working Short Rows demonstrates the Japanese method. As in the German method, an extra loop is pulled up from below to disguise the turning point; instead of pulling it up with a YO, the working yarn is marked when the work is turned and later pulled up to create the extra loop at the time of closing the gap. This method requires a removable stitch marker, bobby pin or scrap yarn to mark the loop to be pulled up. The Japanese method on a knit row: 1. Knit to the turning point, and turn the work; slip the next stitch purlwise. 2. Place a removable stitch marker on the working yarn at the front of the work. 3. Purl the next row as needed. The Japanese method on a purl row: 1. Purl to the turning point, and turn the work; slip the next stitch purlwise. 2. Place a removable stitch marker on the working yarn at the back of the work; knit the next row as . . .

Tutorial: Short Rows using the German method

Tutorial: Short Rows using the German method

The third in my series of tutorials for working Short Rows demonstrates the German method; this is another technique which uses a yarnover instead of wrapping the turning stitch, but instead of the yarnover itself becoming the extra loop, it’s used to pull up a stitch from below to disguise the turning point. The German method on a knit row: 1. Knit to the turning point, and turn the work. Note that when using this method, you will work up to and including the turning stitch. In the w&t method, you’re technically working to one stitch before the turning stitch. 2. Slip the next stitch purlwise. 3. Bring the working yarn to the back over the right needle, and pull upwards so that the stitch below the slipped stitch is pulled partially up onto the needle. This creates what appears to be an odd-looking double stitch, but it’s not a mistake. 4. Bring the working yarn to the front again between the needles; purl the next row. The German method on a purl row: 1. . . .

Inside the Vortex