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knit.wear Spring/Summer 2016

knit.wear Spring/Summer 2016

Interweave has relaunched what is my favorite of their magazines, knit.wear.  Premiering in Fall of 2011, the designs and aesthetic have always had that very clean, modern and sophisticated vibe. The semi annual publication changed its name in Fall of 2014 to knit.purl, but now has returned to its original name. The new issue is full of fashion-forward designs, modern technique tutorials and inspiring articles, and includes my Kline Shawl. From knit.wear, “The dual stripes in garter and stockinette stitch engage each other in stylistic play across this asymmetrical wrap. An electric pop of color is offset by a black-and-white speckled counterpoint as a nod to contemporary art.” On a personal note, I loved the speckle yarn – which is very on trend, but I wasn’t sure about at all, being a fan of solids and semisolids. It’s madelinetosh tosh merino light in Optic, paired with the vibrant Edison Bulb. The digital issue is available for download from Interweave, or you can order the print publication.

Indie Design Gift-A-Long 2015

Indie Design Gift-A-Long 2015

It’s that time of year again; the Indie Design Gift-A-Long 2015 brings together 100s of designers and 1000s of crafters, prepping for the holidays together. The event runs now through 12/31 and kicks off with a 25% sale on select patterns until November 27 with code giftalong2015. These are my sale patterns, and you can find them in the Gift-A-Long 2015 bundle  on my Ravelry designer page. Join us on Ravelry, and Happy Gifting!

Interview: Laura Patterson of Fiber Dreams

Interview: Laura Patterson of Fiber Dreams

The Indie Design Gift-A-Long is in full swing on Ravelry, with so many talented designers participating, and such an array of beautiful patterns. Today I’m talking with the very talented Laura Patterson of Fiber Dreams, who has an amazing catalog of designs all of which feature thoughtfully combined elements and detail, as well as evocative names and descriptive inspiration. I asked Laura about her work, and she graciously shared the answers that appear below: How did you get started designing? Not long after I started knitting, I began tweaking the patterns I knit. I didn’t like the rolled collar on a pullover, so knit ribbing instead, I added length and pockets to a too-short cardigan, worked a different top treatment on a sock or changed the toe. Mostly it was little stuff like that, but after a while there was almost always some change I made. Then I started making more drastic changes, like changing the gauge for a sweater I loved to work with the yarn I had on hand. Throughout all this my . . .

Tutorial: Seamless Simultaneous Set-in Sleeves

Tutorial: Seamless Simultaneous Set-in Sleeves

As a confirmed topdown sweater knitter, I’ve embraced raglan, seamless set-in, and contiguous sleeve constructions that begin with a cast on at the top. My latest favorite adds the simultaneously worked sleeve to the seamless, set-in method. It’s a nifty way to create that tailored set-in sleeve look, without having to pick up stitches for the sleeve cap from the armhole and then work short rows, or knit the sleeve separately and seam it into the armhole. Mind you, I love a good short row sleeve cap. It’s just nice to have additional techniques available for when you feel like a change, or have a technical need such as an easy way to make perfectly matched stripes around the upper body and sleeves of a sweater. Simultaneous sleeves are a variation of the seamless topdown sweater method. In that method, you cast on stitches for the back shoulders and neck, and work (often with a tiny bit of short row shoulder shaping) to the armscye depth. Then you pick up stitches from each back shoulder . . .

Inside the Vortex