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Tutorial: Short Rows using the German method

Tutorial: Short Rows using the German method

The third in my series of tutorials for working Short Rows demonstrates the German method; this is another technique which uses a yarnover instead of wrapping the turning stitch, but instead of the yarnover itself becoming the extra loop, it’s used to pull up a stitch from below to disguise the turning point. The German method on a knit row: 1. Knit to the turning point, and turn the work. Note that when using this method, you will work up to and including the turning stitch. In the w&t method, you’re technically working to one stitch before the turning stitch. 2. Slip the next stitch purlwise. 3. Bring the working yarn to the back over the right needle, and pull upwards so that the stitch below the slipped stitch is pulled partially up onto the needle. This creates what appears to be an odd-looking double stitch, but it’s not a mistake. 4. Bring the working yarn to the front again between the needles; purl the next row. The German method on a purl row: 1. . . .

Tutorial: Short Rows using the yarnover method

Tutorial: Short Rows using the yarnover method

The second in my series of tutorials for working Short Rows demonstrates the yarnover method; this technique uses a backwards yarnover instead of wrapping the turning stitch, and then works that extra loop to disguise the turning point. To yarnover on a knit row: 1. Knit to the turning point, and turn the work. 2. Make a backwards YO by bringing the yarn to the back between the needles . . . 3 .  . . . and then over the right needle to the front again; purl the next row. Purling that first stitch may be a bit fiddly with the yarnover coming over the needle, but it helps to hold it in place with your finger. To yarnover on a purl row: 1. Purl to the turning point, and turn the work. 2. Make a backwards YO by bringing the yarn to the front between the needles . . . 3.  . . . and then over the right needle to the back again; knit the next row. To work the yarnover on . . .

What I Did On My Summer Vacation 2014

What I Did On My Summer Vacation 2014

Going bicoastal, and international as well, we followed my daughter’s Pacific Northwest leanings and visited Victoria, British Columbia and Seattle, Washington. It was ALOT of travel the first day, but then we woke up to this. And traveled outside the old-timey sort of city for the nature part of the trip – beaches and trees. Repatriated once again, it was Seafair week, with ships and the Blue Angels. The entire trip was uncharacteristically sunny and hot (except for the last morning’s ride back to the airport), so we had great touristing. Which means we probably need to go back to experience the greyness. All images courtesy of my panorama-loving spouse, Gary Karlsrud. Yes; used with permission.  

Tutorial: Short Rows using the wrap & turn method

Tutorial: Short Rows using the wrap & turn method

Short Rows are one of my very favorite knitting things, ever. Need to shape a hem, make a bust dart or a shoulder slope? No seaming, no binding off, no problem – just work short rows and you can have angled sections of knitting that create shape and make a garment better fitting, or a shawl more interesting. There are many ways to work short rows, all of which involve working a partial row (thus, the “short”) and then using one of several methods to turn the work and go back in the opposite direction, while making the turning point unobtrusive and attractive. Perhaps the most common and basic is the wrap & turn method, sometimes abbreviated to w&t. To work it, here’s what you have to do: To w&t on a knit row: 1. Knit to the turning point; with yarn in back, insert the right needle tip purlwise into the next st, and slip it to the right needle. 2. Bring the yarn to the front. 3. Slip the wrapped st back to . . .

Inside the Vortex